BOARD FOR CERTIFICATION OF GENEALOGISTS WELCOMES FIVE TRUSTEES—TWO NEW AND THREE RE-ELECTED

BOARD FOR CERTIFICATION OF GENEALOGISTS WELCOMES FIVE TRUSTEES—TWO NEW AND THREE RE-ELECTED

Returning for another three-year term as trustees of the Board for Certification of Genealogists are:

  • Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG, of Chicago, Illinois. Board-certified since 1999, she has served as BCG Treasurer from 2010 to 2014, and President from 2014 to 2017. Bloom is a full-time professional researcher specializing in Chicago and Cook County research, problem solving, and multi-generational family histories. In her previous career she was a banker and a financial planning analyst.
  • Stefani Evans, CG, of Las Vegas, Nevada. Board-certified in 2005 and elected as a trustee in 2011, she currently serves as BCG Vice President and co-chair of the conference committee. She previously served as a BCG Education Fund Trustee, a director of the National Genealogical Society (NGS), and conference chair for the NGS 2013 Family History Conference. Evans is a Doctoral candidate in the History of the North American West at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.
  • Nancy A. Peters, CG, of Aiken, South Carolina. Board-certified in 2011, she has served as a BCG trustee and as the editor of OnBoard since 2014. As a full-time genealogist, her client work, genealogical publications, and classroom instruction focus on solving complex kinship and identity problems. In her previous career, Peters had her own consulting practice—designing, developing, and instructing software training courses for corporate clients.

Joining them are two newly elected trustees:

  • Allen R. Peterson, CG, of Katy, Texas. He was board-certified in 2009 and served as the Director of the Katy Texas Family History Center for seventeen years. He began researching in Great Britain in the middle 1990s and has authored numerous articles on British and U.S. genealogy including ten that have been published in the National Genealogical Society Quarterly. Peterson recently retired as a petroleum geologist with Apache Corporation in Houston.
  • Karen Stanbary, CG, of Chicago, Illinois. Board-certified since 2017, she chairs the BCG Genetic Genealogy Standards committee, working on establishing best practices for the incorporation of DNA evidence into genealogical conclusions. Stanbary is bilingual in English and Spanish, holds her MA in Clinical Social Work from the University of Chicago, and has worked as a Licensed Clinical Social Worker for the past twenty-four years.

All 15 trustees are board-certified, and all serve without compensation. Five are elected by certified associates each year. The new trustees’ terms of office will begin at the end of the October 7th trustees’ meeting in Salt Lake City.

For questions or more information contact: Nicki Peak Birch, CG, office@BCGcertification.org.

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL, and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

BCG Offers Six Free Lectures (Live or by Webinar) on 6 October 2017

Top genealogists Jeanne Bloom, Martha Garrett, LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, Jill Morelli, Ann Staley, and Tom Jones will present six one-hour lectures at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City Friday, 6 October 2017 between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Mountain U.S. time. The lectures are free and open to the public (registration is not required), and sponsored by the Board for Certification of Genealogists. All will be broadcast online (free registration is required, see below). The Board is an independent certifying body and author of the updated 2014 Genealogy Standards.

Times, topics, and speakers:

9:00 a.m. – “Sweden’s Multiple Naming Systems and How They Changed in the 1800s.” Martha Garrett, CG

10:15 a.m. – “Past Conflict Repatriation: The Role of Genealogists and Methodology in Fulfilling Our Nation’s Promise.” Jeanne Bloom, CG

11:30 a.m. – “Reasonably Exhaustive Research of African American Families That Came Out of Slavery.” LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG

1:30 p.m. – “Using Timelines for Correlation and Analysis.” Jill Morelli, CG

2:45 p.m. – “Land, Licenses, Love Gone Wrong, and Other Assorted Courthouse Records.” Ann Staley, CG, CGL

4:00 p.m. – “Systematically Using Autosomal DNA Test Results to Help Break Through Genealogical Brick Walls.” Tom Jones, PhD, CG, CGL

“Whether you stop in for the lectures or join online, you will learn more about how to apply good methodology to your family research,” said President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG. “The Board for Certification of Genealogists strives to foster public confidence in genealogy by promoting an attainable, uniform standard of competence and ethics. Educating all family historians of every level is part of this mission.”

For questions or more information contact office@BCGcertification.org.

Register for the Online Broadcasts

All six classes will be broadcast online by BCG’s webinar partner, Legacy Family Tree Webinars. BCG receives a commission if you register by clicking our affiliate links: http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=2619 to sign up individually (free), or http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=3049 to sign up for multiple classes at once.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars using our affiliate link at http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=2619 and http://bcgcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars. Again, BCG receives a commission if you register by clicking and buying via our affiliate link. For more information on educational opportunities, please visit: http://www.BCGcertification.org/certification/educ.html.

Cari A. Taplin, CG
BCG News Release Coordinator

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL, and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

 

BCG Offers Free Webinar: “When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion” by Tom Jones, PhD, CG, CGL

BCG OFFERS FREE WEBINAR Tuesday, 19 September, 8:00 p.m. Eastern
“When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion?”
by Tom Jones, PhD, CG, CGL

Even thorough research can miss relevant sources. What are the options when useful information or DNA test results appear after a researcher establishes a conclusion?

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) will present “When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion?” by Tom Jones, PhD, CG, CGL free to the public at 8:00 p.m. EDT, 19 September 2017.

Tom has been pursuing his ancestry since 1963. For the first twenty-five years he was clueless about what he was trying to accomplish and how to do it. When he started climbing the genealogy learning curve he repeatedly experienced the challenges, joys, and rewards of tracing ancestors reliably and fully understanding their lives. Tom eventually became an award-winning writer, board-certified genealogist, editor of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly, recipient of honors from genealogical organizations, and author of the textbook Mastering Genealogical Proof. Using his nearly lifelong teaching career as a springboard, he enjoys teaching at week-long genealogy institutes, weekend seminars, and local, national, and international genealogy conferences.

President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG, says, “The Board for Certification of Genealogists is proud to offer this new webinar as part of an ongoing series that supports our mission to provide education for family historians. This webinar will address genealogy standards for research. By promoting a uniform standard of competence and ethics BCG endeavors to foster public confidence in genealogy.”

Register for “When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion?” by Tom Jones, PhD, CG, CGL before 19 September 2017. BCG receives a commission if you register by clicking our affiliate link: http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=2619.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact: office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars using our affiliate link at http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=2619 and http://bcgcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars. Again, BCG receives a commission if you register by clicking and buying via our affiliate link. For more information on educational opportunities, please visit: http://www.BCGcertification.org/certification/educ.html.

Cari A. Taplin, CG
BCG News release Coordinator

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL, and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

Skillbuilding, NGS 2017: Little’s “Recreating Your Ancestor’s Neighborhood”

SpringBoard, an official blogger for the 2017 National Genealogical Society (NGS) Family History Conference, is pleased to offer a review of this BCG Skillbuilding lecture, presented 12 May 2017.

 F311, Barbara Vines Little, CG, FNGS, FVGS “Recreating Your Ancestor’s Neighborhood”

Reviewed by Jean Atkinson Andrews, CG

Description: When researchers hit a brick wall, the advice is usually the same–consider the neighbors. But first, we have to find them.

 

“Neighbors tell us a lot of things . . . “ where they came from, who they married, and who they were. Neighbors’ stories may tell what it was like for our family.

Barbara Vines Little, CG, FNGS, FVGS

Barbara Vines Little, CG, FNGS, FVGS

Barbara Vines Little is a Virginia research expert, but the contents of this lecture can be used by anyone, anywhere because it focuses on resources and document types applicable to many problems of identity or location. Barbara’s approach has been developed over forty years of experience using land plats, maps, and other types of documents to identify and place ancestors and their neighbors.

Maps–You Need Them . . . and you may have to create your own!

While many ancestors can be traced back into the mid-1800’s with relative ease, before 1840 trails can grow cold, especially in frontier areas. Historical and topographical maps can help. Topographic maps help measure distance, locate the nearest waterways, and show high and low terrain. In the past waterways were roads, not barriers, and people used them all the time.

Also neighborhoods are not only defined by geographical proximity. Churches, collateral relatives, work, and school or fraternal groups can all constitute a neighborhood. Within the lecture, Barbara offers numerous suggestions, resources, and examples of using on-line map tools and websites she has found.

Deed and land maps help us understand when and how an area was settled, and estimate when an ancestor might have arrived. Often settlement in a frontier area begins when wealthy men start buying large tracts for speculation. This is followed five to ten years later by families purchasing smaller tracts, usually along the rivers first, and settling on that land.

Understanding patterns of settlement helps you find out who else may have been there with your ancestor, and who was not. It can also tell you if he was one of the first settlers in an area, or if he waited awhile before moving in. Other documents which may help locate neighbors are tax lists and road orders. Tax lists may help you identify renters, when people moved in and out, or when they died. Road orders can tell you proximity, because residents worked the road they lived on or near.

The lecture ends with many document and map suggestions from Barbara’s decades of research experience. Some of these are familiar, others may be little known to even experienced genealogists. All of them are worth considering to solve a difficult problem.

Information on purchasing this lecture can be found at Playback Now www.playbackngs.com.

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL, and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

Skillbuilding, NGS 2017: Miller’s “Sources or Clues? Pitfalls of Using Published Genealogies and Online Trees”

Springboard, an official blogger for the 2017 National Genealogical Society (NGS) Family History Conference, is pleased to offer a review of this BCG Skillbuilding lecture, presented 10 May 2017.

W141, Julie Miller, CG, CGL, FNGS, “Sources or Clues? Pitfalls of Using Published Genealogies and Online Trees”

 Reviewed by Angela Packer McGhie, CG

Should online trees be used in our research? If so, are they sources or only clues? Julie Miller suggested that we should use published genealogies and online trees, but we need to use them with caution.

Julie Miller, CG, CGL, FNGS

Julie Miller, CG, CGL, FNGS

Published genealogies can include a vast amount of information, and that makes them valuable. Researchers should recognize that when most of them were published, there were no standards. They do not usually provide sources for information, so the information must be evaluated and verified with other sources. Published genealogies may contain information that was provided by descendants, or may be from a source that is lost.

Online family trees are mostly user submitted and their quality ranges from very good, to very, very bad. Some are wholesale copied from other trees. They do have value, in that they can connect you with others working on the same family, and they can contain clues not found elsewhere. The key is to evaluate them and verify all information they contain. Julie suggests verifying each date, place, relationship, and event with other records. The trees can be used as a map to guide you to original sources.

Julie shared a case study demonstrating the information that can be found in these sources, and her process for verifying with other records. She noted that wrong information in these sources causes many genealogists to make incorrect conclusions. In her case study, if Julie had relied on the information provided by the majority of the sources, she would have misidentified the wife.

The presentation concluded with advice from Julie to not be part of the problem. She recommends only publishing or putting online information you have personally researched.

Information on purchasing this lecture can be found at Playback Now www.playbackngs.com .

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL, and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

Coming Soon from OnBoard, September 2017

OnBoard: Newsletter of the Board for Certification of Genealogists is scheduled to publish in September 2017. We’re pleased to offer a preview of some of its content.

OnBoard Masthead-Sept2017“Using Proof by Contradiction to Focus your Research”

Applying the third element of the Genealogical Proof Standard,1 Yvette Hoitink, CG, shows how creating and testing hypotheses for contradictions can keep our research on the right path. She offers a step-by-step example of combining historical context and negative evidence to evaluate three hypotheses for the identities of a seventeenth-century Dutch property owner’s heirs.

“Finding the Truth in the Undocumented Story”

Family stories make our history come alive. Whether it’s sensational tales of family feuds and black sheep, or simply the everyday lives of ancestors, most genealogists come across an undocumented story in family research. Gail Jackson Miller, CG, provides us a framework for critically analyzing our undocumented stories to draw out the truth. She explains how using her family story about the murder of Cotton Davis.

OnBoard publishes three issues per year. A subscription is included in annual associate fees and is provided to applicants “on the clock.” Subscriptions are also available to the general public for $15.00 per year (currently) through the BCG website, here <http://www.bcgcertification.org/catalog/bcgitems.html>. Issues back to 1995 can also be ordered online, here <http://www.bcgcertification.org/catalog/backordlst.html>.

 

1 Board for Certification of Genealogists, Genealogy Standards (Nashville, Tenn.: Ancestry.com, 2014), 1–2.

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL, and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

Associates in Action

Associates in Action highlights BCG associates’ news, activities, and accomplishments. Contact Alice Hoyt Veen to include your news in an upcoming post.

Awards & Achievements

The Board for Certification of Genealogists congratulates the following associates on their successful credential renewals:

Ann Fleming, CG, Chesterfield, Missouri; initial certification 17 June 1994. annf26@att.net

Karen Daniel, CG, Albuquerque, New Mexico; initial certification 31 August 1992. kdangene@msn.com

Career News

Angela Packer McGhie, CG, has been appointed as the new instructor for the Professional Genealogy module of the Boston University Genealogical Research Certificate Program beginning Fall 2017.

BCG Offers Free Webinar: “Analyzing Probate Records of Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors” by LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG

BCG OFFERS FREE WEBINAR Tuesday, 15 August, 8:00 p.m. Eastern
“Analyzing Probate Records of Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors”
by LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG

This webinar will provide an overview of the probate process, the genealogical information that can be found in a slaveholding estate, and related records that a probate proceeding may point to.

LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG. Board-certified since 2015, LaBrenda focuses on African American families with roots in the South. She was elected as a trustee of the Board for Certification of Genealogists in 2016 and is a frequent speaker at national and local venues. She earned a BA in government from John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, and both a Law degree and a Master of Laws degree from New York University School of Law. LaBrenda took first place in the category for published authors in the 2013 International Society of Family History Writers and Editors “Excellence-in-Writing Competition” and has also been published in the BCG blog as well the National Genealogical Society Quarterly. While practicing law she authored several editions of her family history as well as two church histories, and in 2016 she published a guide and selected finding aids for researching African Americans in South Carolina.

“We are pleased to offer these educational opportunities to the community,” says President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG. “The Board for Certification of Genealogists strives to foster public confidence in genealogy by promoting an attainable, uniform standard of competence and ethics. Educating all family historians of every level is part of this mission.”

Register for “Analyzing Probate Records of Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors” by LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG before 15 August 2017. BCG receives a commission if you register by clicking our affiliate link: http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=2619.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact: office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars using our affiliate link at http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=2619 and http://bcgcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars. Again, BCG receives a commission if you register by clicking and buying via our affiliate link. For more information on educational opportunities, please visit: http://www.BCGcertification.org/certification/educ.html.

Cari A. Taplin, CG
BCG News Release Coordinator

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL, and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

Associates in Action

Associates in Action highlights BCG associates’ news, activities, and accomplishments. Contact Alice Hoyt Veen to include your news in an upcoming post.

Awards & Achievements

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) Trustees has honored Ronald Ames Hill, PhD, CG, and Linda Woodward Geiger, CG, CGL, with Certified Genealogist Emeritus status. BCG offers Emeritus status to board-certified genealogists who have had long and distinguished careers with BCG, and who are now retired from the genealogical profession.

Karen Stanbary, CG, has received the National Genealogical Society Quarterly (NGSQ) Award for Excellence, 2016, for her article, “Rafael Arriaga, A Mexican Father in Michigan: Autosomal DNA Helps Identify Paternity,” National Genealogical Society Quarterly 104 (June 2016), 85–98.

The Board for Certification of Genealogists congratulates the following associates on their successful credential renewals:

Donn Devine, CG, Wilmington, Delaware; initial certification 21 April 1987. donndevine@aol.com

Nancy C. Levin, CG, Natick, Massachusetts; initial certification 1 January 1997. NCLevin1@gmail.com

Daniela Moneta, CG, Phoenix, Arizona; initial certification 20 Februry 2007. Daniela@GenealogyOne-on-One.com; dmoneta@cox.nethttp://www.GenealogyOne-on-One.com

Career News

The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society (NYG&B) has announced the retirement of editor Karen Mauer Jones, CG, and the selection of Laura Murphy DeGrazia, CG, as editor of The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record (The Record).

Publications

Darcie Hind Posz, CG, The Chicago Stones: A Genealogy of Acquisition, Influence & Scandal (Privately Published: Darcie Hind Posz, 2017). http://darcieposz.weebly.com. The book is available for purchase through Lulu Marketplace: http://www.lulu.com/shop/darcie-hind-posz/the-chicago-stones/paperback/product-23235817.html

Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, has a new publication, “Pennsylvania Genealogy,” published by The In-Depth Genealogist. This four-page guide has tips for Pennsylvania research, history and migration routes, a bibliography of guide books, and over fifty useful Pennsylvania website links. It is available for digital download or as part of the printed laminated series “In-Brief with IDG.” Website: http://theindepthgenealogist.com/shop-idg/idg-products

Skillbuilding, NGS 2017: Jones’s “Converting a Bunch of Information into a Credible Conclusion”

SpringBoard, an official blogger for the 2017 National Genealogical Society (NGS) Family History Conference, is pleased to offer a review of this BCG Skillbuilding lecture, presented 12 May 2017.

F351, Thomas Wright Jones, PhD, CG, CGL, FASG, FNGS, FUGA “Converting a Bunch of Information into a Credible Conclusion”

Reviewed by Mary O’Brien Vidlak, CG

Many genealogists are good at collecting “bunches of information” to answer a research question but then struggle to organize and assemble the material to know whether or not a feasible conclusion has been reached. Tom Jones’s BCG Skillbuilding lecture “Converting a Bunch of Information into a Credible Conclusion” focuses on a strategy to assemble this collected information to understand whether you have a viable conclusion or not. If you have a conclusion, you will then be able to see what that conclusion is.

Thomas W. Jones, PhD, CG, CGL, FASG, FNGS, FUGA

Thomas W. Jones, PhD, CG, CGL, FASG, FNGS, FUGA

The presentation introduced the term assemblage, which is defined as “a grouping of evidence items giving tentative answers to a genealogical research question.” Although this is a new word in the genealogical world, it describes something genealogists have been doing for decades.

Assemblages can be either evidence based or event based. Tom shared examples of both kinds of assemblages. The first example of an evidence based assemblage used eighteen sources spanning eight years to answer the question of when a man was born. He then demonstrated how resolution of this birthdate question and the same sources were used in an event based assemblage to resolve an identity question for the same individual.

Tom discussed the three types of evidence assemblage formats: a mental assemblage, text or graphically arranged writing, and a documented graphic. He used various examples to show when each is desirable, and how they can be put together to solve complex cases.

In addition to revealing whether or not you have a conclusion, assemblages can also uncover conflicts in evidence; can expose strengths and weaknesses in conclusions; and may provide ideas for further research.

Tom concluded his lecture on a cautionary note. He reminded his audience to be careful about assembling evidence as soon as it is collected. A conclusion reached from the assemblage before the research is complete can lead to bias.

Assemblage is essential to ensuring work meets the Genealogical Proof Standard. It must meet the standard of reasonably exhaustive research to be complete. The concept of putting evidence into an assemblage corresponds to the correlation part of the GPS. Finally, the fifth step of the GPS—a soundly reasoned, coherently written conclusion—cannot be reached without assembling the collected evidence in some way.

Information on purchasing this lecture can be found at Playback Now www.playbackngs.com.

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL, and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.